All posts by Sophia Drager

Reformation Heritage Lecture 2-25-17

DESCRIBE

The Reformation Heritage Lecture Series was in the Graebner Memorial Chapel on Tuesday, February 7, 2017. The guest speaker was Dr. Sarah Hinlicky Wilson, presenting “Remaking the World with Law and Gospel.” Dr. Hinlicky began her speech by sharing her weird hobby of finding people’s bad habit of confusing Law and Gospel. She knew that this was not an exciting topic for most of us, but explained that it was important for all to understand so we could get closer to God. Her main point was to eliminate confusion of what is and what is not Law. She laid out her lecture in this manner, starting with Luther’s new found love of the New and Old Testaments and how he saw the Gospel throughout the whole Bible. If Luther had not found grace in the Old Testament, he would not have loved it so much and set out to make a positive impact on the Old Testament, so Christians would read it rather than avoiding it because of the rules. Dr. Hinlicky emphasized that the Law is not just a system of rules, but how God wishes His people to live with others — in peace and love. The Law is not just what we ought to do, but what God does. One statement that stuck with me was, “A world without Law is chaos. A Lawless world equals a loveless God.” Law judges what we cannot do, but the Old Testament contains a promise of a Savior.

Dr. Hinlicky transitioned to the message of the Gospel in the New Testament. She explained the false ideas that some Christians accept such as, “once the Gospel is present there is no need for Law.” Wrong! The Gospel is not about us, but what Christ did for us. All Christians must recognize Christ both as a freely given gift, and as our example to exercise His Word. Using Christ as an example causes us to love others in the same way. The link between the Law and Gospel is Christ. Christ showed us Law through His actions of love to others. It is easier to show someone love than to tell them love. One other misconception Christians are confused with are the roles in the Trinity. Some believe the Father is full of wrath, while the loving Son yields the Gospel, but this is wrong also. God does not fight against His Son; He works with His Son in a way called “Wrath Loving.” The Father gives creation, the Son works, and the Holy Spirit gives gifts and is poured out on us — a passionate heart.

As Dr. Hinlicky wrapped up her speech, she reminded us first that we cannot forgive others until we know how God forgives us through the work of Christ’s death and resurrection, and second, vast mercy is veiled to us, until we know the vast law. Third, she reminded us that we do not live lawlessly, but the Grace of God and the Gospel is written into the heart of God’s Law. Just as Luther saw it when he learned the Good News of Christ as Savior and gained human comprehension of a loving God.

INTEGRATE

 Today, America has found others to not be acceptable for this country. As Christians we must remember that Christ was once a refugee. He used the parable of the Good Samaritan, a foreigner, as an example to show that it is not a matter of prejudging, but to help understand how unworthy everyone is of grace and yet Christ still provides it for us. In Honors 120 we learn that the best way to understand another person’s culture, background, and support their situation is to listen. As Christians, we are called to love one another and use Christ as our example, who was once a refugee. As individuals in the Honors class, we may not know what it is like to be a refugee, but we can still act in love by not prejudging others, listening to them, and continuing to dive into God’s Word to find answers. 

EVALUATE

 The one sentence I will take away is, “A lawless world equals a loveless God.” I find this very true, especially after this lecture. God does not give us the Law to just tell us what we ought not to do, but remind us what God does for His people and how He wants us to live with others–in peace and love. If God did not love us He would not have given us the Law or sent the Gospel of Christ as the perfect example, who followed the Law by acting in love with others.

Latino Art Migration 2-02-17 Updated 2-25-17

DESCRIBE

Going into the Art Opening was interesting. As I walked in I was stopped by a S.W.A.T. team member who violently put a stamp on my sheet and took my picture to get in. There were many pictures and forms of art. The ones that stuck out were the gun hanging from the ceiling by Gustavo Torres, the pictures on the wall painted in blood by Luis Fitch, the two black caskets named “Vestige” by Jonathan Herrera, a big poster with a man and many colorful pictures on his back by Ana Laura Juarez Espinoza, and various posters on the wall named “Import-Export Roots” by Maria Cristina Tavera.

As you walk in, the first thing that catches your eye is the hanging gun in a somewhat bare room. The gun represented 25,000 deaths in Venezuela in 2014, due to crime and lack of safety. The pictures along the wall of “Día De Los Muertos” art were beautiful and each picture represents the artist’s frustration with Mexico’s government and the violence in the country. The artist painted his pictures with his own blood to represent the bloodshed and crime in Mexico; “In particular, the mass kidnapping of 43 male students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers’ College who went missing in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico on September 26, 2014” (Luis Fitch). Next to the paintings were two black caskets. In the taller casket was a drawing of a life preserver and in the small casket was a drawing of a milk jug. They represent the weight that people who migrate carry, the resources they have to barely keep them alive, and the little help, safety, and sliver of hope they have make the exhausting journey to America. The caskets represent the people who have not made the journey, but still end up on America’s shores with some other floatation devices. The poster with the man holding many colorful pictures reflect the artist’s family history she wishes she knew, the displacement she now feels to her her ancestors’ homeland, and her curiosity to explore what her parents left behind and experienced. The last piece of art was the artist Maria Cristina Tavera’s experiences from Mexico to America with correlation to the information she has to give the U.S. government about herself and the expectations she is forced to conform to. Maria had a poster about green card marriages and the information one would have to file about the relationship, such as the first time the couple met and where they went on a first or even second date.

 

INTEGRATE

In Honors we learned about white people being the majority and how many people of other cultures having to conform to a white lifestyle to succeed. Many people who make the agonizing journey to America start out hopeful awaiting the “American Dream,” but end up feeling displaced, uninvited, and end up trying to create a new identity. Many artists, including Luis Fitch, Jonathan Herrera, and Gustavo Torres, focus on the trials that immigrants face in Mexico and on their journey to America. Maria Cristina Tavera and Ana Laura Juarez Espinoza portrayed their life and desire to remember their culture and how they conformed to the white majority’s lifestyles.

 

EVALUATE

I enjoyed the art exhibition. I think the idea behind the S.W.A.T. team member stamping the entrance form was a good idea to portray the cold feeling people have toward immigrants, but the idea would have come across more prominently if it were harder to get in. The two pieces that had the most impact on me were the “Día De Los Muertos” and “Vestige.” Seeing the caskets was very sad. My friend works in the coastguard and she has to experience first hand the people and items that wash up on America’s shores. When I walked into the art gallery, I first noticed the “Día De Los Muertos” pictures. I thought that the pictures were made of blood, but I was not going to say anything to who was with me until I was sure. It turned out to be true, that the pictures were indeed made out of the artist’s blood. I think the fact the art was made out of blood added depth to the artist’s purpose of expressing their frustration with Mexico’s government and crime rates. Overall, I really enjoyed the exhibit. One thing I noticed while in the exhibit were the many people around me who did not look Hispanic, but spoke Spanish. It proved to me that culture has no skin color and that I may inhibit stereotypical tendencies by associating skin color with culture and language.

Spoon River 2-07-17

DESCRIBE

Spoon River is a stage adaption from Edgar Lee Master’s poem, Spoon River Anthology. This play’s adaptation was created and directed by Kate Sandvik with the accompaniment of live music conducted by Professor Speer. The play starts in Spoon River, Illinois with a little girl, known as a passer-by, who wanders the cemetery remembering the life of her grandfather after his funeral. She is greeted by many people of Spoon River and is informed of their life stories and their deaths. Each person gives their story of their death and how they wanted to be remembered through songs and dances. The end of Spoon River was bittersweet. There were pictures of the actor’s family members on the projector behind the actors holding candles on a dark stage to remind us that we are all Spoon River. The curtain call turned the focus from the audience thinking of death to a state of happiness with clapping, dancing, and music. Even though it is hard to know peoples legacy from the time period Spoon River was set in (1800’s), many people can use this play as a reminder to think before they acts to create a legacy of how they want to be remembered.

 

INTEGRATE

Each student in Honors is writing a twenty page research paper on an African American who has been killed by a police officer with in the past five years. Many of these people’s names sounded familiar to the class, but their stories were lost in time. Some men and women were not recognized at all. The Honors class read a poem by Claudia Ranke that had the victims names disappear as the reader goes down the page. In the play, Spoon River, the passer-by wiped the dirt of of the grave headstones to reveal the person’s name. The passer-by did not know the person’s life and death, until the play explained it to the passer-by and the audience. Eventually each student in Honors will reveal each victim’s story of their life and death that many people will forget or may not know about, just as the passer-by uncovered the headstones in the graveyard and heard the people’s stories.

 

EVALUATE

I went to see the play on Saturday, January 21st. The play was good and the music was enjoyable. I thought the music fit in really well with the play. I like how the play incorporated Christian hymns with a bit of a country style to help give an old timey feel. It was interesting to see pictures from the war and to remind me that everyone has their own story and only a handful of people’s voices are documented. To think that there are people in the Bible who had their story heard, but there were many others around the world who had never heard of God, not had their stories documented, and are most likely not thought about by many today. Spoon River made me feel a lot of mixed emotions of happiness, sadness, and fear. My greatest fear is death, so this play was a bit uncomfortable for me. It made me think about what legacy and stories I leave behind for others and what image I display to others now that will be remembered, if at all.

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind book review

FRAMING

Mark A. Noll specializes in Christian history in the United States, and holds the position of Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind has two sections; the first section contains a insight on Christology, and the second portion of the book contains material on different aspects of Christian learning and how to apply areas of human learning to religion and Christology.

CONTENT AND METHODOLOGY

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind is laid out in eight chapters focusing on two topics: Christology and applying human learning to Christianity by trying “to show how an evangelical understanding of Christ’s saving work might affect scholarship of several kinds” (pg. 65). As a Christian historian, Noll uses his knowledge to generate ideas of how Christians can be involved in all types of learning. He shows how Christians can apply their faith to learning through doubleness, particularity, contingency, and self-denial. Throughout the book, Noll stresses the work of Jesus in people’s lives and how God can show up in every occupation. He includes portions of the Nicene Creed and doctrinal truths in each chapter to prove that Christians have, can, and should pursue secular studies. “They are not intended as final words laying down a law but as first words urging others to take up the task” (65). In chapter two, Noll takes his main point and uses subjects like chemistry, the social sciences, and art to show how Christ is relevant in all forms of human learning. Each subtopic further explains Noll’s understanding of who God is and how one can study to gain a hopeful result in a greater understanding of Christ and His beautiful creation. In the second half of the book, Noll talks about the varieties of providential history. He makes the point that historians can write from two perspectives: general revelation or spiritual revelation. Noll stresses that it is important for historians to specify which perspective they are writing from. The last chapter explains the importance of the Bible and how the Bible proves itself to be true. Then Noll explains how archaeologists learn about the culture of Christ’s time and find artifacts that show evidence for the Bible. He stresses that the Bible is the guide for what Christians believe, and that scripture will always interpret scripture, and that the main theme of the Bible is Jesus.

ANALYSIS

Noll made the point in chapter two that Christ is revealed in all forms of human learning. Noll describes in the portion, ”’Through Whom He Made the Universe’: The Origin of All Things in Christ,” how Christians can learn in areas of study and through this show the work of Christ. In Honors, we talked about this using the example of a chemistry experiment (24). This example gave the impression that if the experiment did not go right it was because Jesus did not make it work. I think the problem arises when Jesus is seen as the result of the experiment not working, and not the imperfections of man’s calculations or the the inability of two substances to react a certain way because of the way God intended and created it to happen. “Remember how God’s glory had been experienced in ancient Israel so they could understand the momentous thing that had happened in their midst… In his gospel John underscored what it meant for the unapproachable holiness of God to become approachable in Jesus Christ” (5). As previously stated, Noll recognizes God was present in the creation, He exposed His glory to the people of Israel, and is present in Christians’ lives today. Although Honors and Noll stressed that God is ever present in our lives, God also created the world and formed it to work the way He planned. God can still be present in Christians’ lives, but that does not mean He caused an experiment not to work for an individual just because He said so.

Although I disagreed with some of Noll’s points, I enjoyed the book and its content on explaining Christ’s relevance in human learning and Christology in a historian’s viewpoint.

CONCLUSION

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind contains two main points: the understanding of Christology, and helpful material on different aspects of Christian learning and how to apply areas of human learning to religion and Christology. “Christianity is defined by the person and the work of Jesus Christ. The doctrinal truths supporting this assertion–as set out in Scripture and summarized in the major Christian creeds–provide a compelling reason for pursuing human learning” (ix).

WORKS CITED

Noll, Mark A. Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Pub., 2011. Print.

3rd Peacock: Capon Book Review

INTRODUCTION

Robert Farrar Capon wrote The Third Peacock to help readers overcome trials in their lives, to understand the problem of evil, and understand how God is placed in our lives with the notion that God created evil. Capon illustrates God’s love for us as being a romantic love, making out with the world.

FRAMING

Capon was an Episcopalian priest for forty-five years, a teacher in seminary for twenty-two years, and an author. After Capon’s divorce with his wife he was asked to leave his church in Long Island; then he decided to write about his experiences. He wrote a total of twenty theological books.  He even wrote several cookbooks. His informal writing style engages readers through stories, images, and liberal doses of his memory to serve as examples that relate his experiences with his audience. The Third Peacock was written and revised for his three series book in order to better relate and explain the love God has for human beings and His creation to his readers, who are going through times of trial.

CONTENT

The Third Peacock has nine chapters and each carries its own message of God’s love for the world by being on the hook for evil and His thing for human beings. Capon explains two main views that people have: In the Christian perspectives, bad things are really blessings and to most atheists God cannot do anything about it, so He just doesn’t care what others think about Him. Capon brings to light that in many instances God does not try to answer a question but shows up and invites His people into the mystery.  Capon describes the creation of the world as a dinner party with the Trinity. “..After supper that night, the Son and the Holy Spirit put on the tremendous show of being for the Father. It was full of water and lights and frogs; pine cones kept dropping all over the place, and crazy fish swim around in the wine glasses. There are mushrooms and mastodons, grapes and geese, tornadoes and tigers-and men and women everywhere to taste them, to juggle them, join them, and to love them” (Capon 176). Capon uses this beautiful analogy to describe the creation, but goes on to explain that God has a special thing for humans. Capon uses the analogy of the princess and the peacock to explain the goodness of God and the badness of man. How God creates good, but through sin, man has made it bad. He loves humans so much because of the freedom, but with freedom comes evil and the choice to do evil.

This concept is met with the idea that God is not off the hook for evil and that He loves to get His hands dirty, not just when He made man. “In other words, the way is open to the Good News that God in Christ doesn’t wait for the world to save itself. Instead of standing at some antiseptic distant from our agonies and our failures, he comes to meet us in the very thick of them.  In Jesus, he dies our death, he becomes sin for our sin, and in the mystery of his resurrection-without thinking a single bit of history-he invites us to believe that he has made all things new” (Capon 174). In another instance Capon illustrates the goodness of God and badness of man in food. Bunnies are cute and cuddly and coyotes are good as well, but one can not expect a hungry coyote to turn down the delectable bunny for some grass. Just as humans have the choice to use their free will, but if there was no sin in the world humans would not have the opportunity to know the grace, mercy, love, and sacrifice for His beings. “Sin is possible only because God puts up with sinners” (Capon 180).

ANALYSIS

      The Sandy Hook shooting was a tragic event, which can be applied to Capon’s argument of why there is evil in the world. Adam Lanza, age twenty, killed his mother at home and then went to the school where she taught kindergarteners and killed twenty-seven people, including himself. Lanza drove his mother’s car to the school and carried three different guns. The police were called at about 9:35 a.m. to find the tragedies left in Lanza’s destructive aftermath and carry out the murderer, not in handcuffs, but in a body bag (Washington post).

Capon’s argument that there is evil in the world is valid because of sin and the free will God gave us. God has a thing for human beings and “is fond of rough places” (Capon 182). This does not mean that God loves the crime, but He does love the person. Because of free will people have messed up the world and God continues to immerse Himself in the world’s grime.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, Capon uses many stories and analogies to shed light on the topic of good and evil.  The beauty of Capon’s book is that it mimics the Bible recognizing evil but celebrating the Good News of our salvation due the forgiveness of our sins by the death of Jesus Christ, while we have both sinners and saints live under the umbrella of the grace and mercy of God the Father.

WORKS CITED

Horwitz, Sari, Steve Vogel, and David A. Fahrenthold. “Sandy Hook Elementary Shooting Leaves 28 Dead, Law Enforcement Sources Say.” Washington Post. The Washington Post, 14 Dec. 2012. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.

Capon, Robert Farrar. The Third Peacock: The Problem of God and Evil. San Francisco: Perennial Library, 1986. Print.

Luther Convocation

DESCRIBE

Tom Rassieur from the Minneapolis Institute of Art was apart of exploration of the Luther restoration and museum exhibition. Rassieur gave the audience a taste of what the Luther exhibition is like in MIA and who Luther was. Luther depicted himself as a poor man with a miner for a father, but in reality Luther was of upper-class wealth and his father was the mayor of Munich at one point. As Luther grew up he changed his name from Luder to Luther meaning freedom in greek, to signify the freedom he had in Christ. Luther was a passionate man for reforming the Christian religion and bringing the truth to light. Rassieur explained that Luther used to teach his students at his home and sent their notes to the printing press to be published for the public so all people could read Luther’s sermons, known as “Table Talks.” tourists saw this table began taking pieces of the table to take a piece of Luther with them and etch in their name into the house to leave a piece of themselves with Luther. Luther’s house was seen as an idol, which Luther was against. Although Luther was seen as a great figure in history, he was an unrestrained man and very offensive. Luther wrote about the love of God and the desire for Jews to join the Lutheran synod, but when they rejected his invitation and Luther was blunt about expressing his beliefs about other religions.

INTEGRATE

As a young boy Luther was raised a catholic. As he grew older he had a life changing experience that caused him to become a monk. Luther struggled with the idea of a just and loving God. He punished himself for his sins and lived in constant fear. The head monk’s saw Luther’s self torment and suggested he take on a new role as a theology teacher. Luther dove into his studies and learned the truth to God’s grace, power, and love. Luther had a revelation. In honors revelation is defined as a word that changes my story by entering my story as someone like me. Luther applied Jesus’ forgiveness, grace, and love for him to drive his passion for the ultimate truth for all people.

EVALUATE

I thought the convocation was interesting. I appreciate Rassieur’s passion for knowing more about Luther and his vast knowledge he wanted to share. It was fascinating to hear how his speech ended, but his slides did not. One interesting fact that I learned was Luther’s humor towards Wolfgang. Wolfgang gave Luther’s wife a gold ring and Luther dumped it down the toilet and asked wolfgang to not send any more gifts. Luther was very passionate about his work, but sometimes over exaggerated to make negative comments on others. One of the best quotes Luther had to say was, ”Those who drink beer are quick to sleep, those who are quick to sleep do not sin, and those who do not sin go to heaven.”

Bartling Lecture

DESCRIBE
Frank White is a humanitarian who has received many awards for his achievements. He explained his passion about baseball and history in honor of the African Americans baseball player in Minnesota to write his book, They Played for the Love of the Game. To White, baseball is more than a sport or a pastime it’s his family’s history. Frank White’s father, Lou ‘Pud’ White was one of the top catchers in the Twin Cities. White talked about the hardships and struggles African Americans had to deal with in a segregated society, like relying on word of mouth to travel to towns that were accepting, and deal with the stress of Jim Crow’s influence.

INTEGRATE
White did not know as a child that his father was a baseball player, his love for baseball and his father’s past drove him to know the truth. White did extensive amounts of research through photos, artifacts, and stories brought down by generations to find a truth that is consistent. White was considered a narcissistic as a young boy, but he learned to surround himself with other people to gain experience and the truth to life. White uncovered subjective truths, which are truths that are true for him and who he is. This knowledge brought him back to his roots of who he is, what his family loves, and gave him information on the town he loves. White is focused on using his past and the information gained to help the Twin Cities progress in historical evidence and humanitarian values.

EVALUATE
One of the most inspiring parts of the convocation was hearing about Toni Stone, the first African American woman to play in the baseball leagues. As a woman playing in a white, male-dominated sport it is inspiring to me as white woman who plays in a male dominated sport. She broke the mold of what a woman should be and modeled the way for many other women to explore their interests. We have come a long way from a segregated society. Hearing about the ways White lived and the tactics he and his family used to travel, maintain financial stability, and earn a living through segregated baseball teams was very interesting. I enjoy hearing about history and the insight it brings, whether public or personal significance.

Kalia Yang Convocation

DESCRIBE

Kao Kalia Yang said, “Nobody can be the engine for the learning we need to do.” Yang focused the convocation on “the world within.” She did not have a written speech because she wanted her true self and passion to pour out of her. As a result, she explained many details of her experiences growing up in a Hmong culture, embracing the traditional elements, and how to compare her experiences to the audience. Kalia Yang wrote her first book, The Latehomecomer, in response to the love letters she wrote to her grandmother. Yang emphasized the importance of writing, because when she wrote her first book she felt closer to her grandmother and knew she could hold onto the memories she had cherished throughout the years more easily. Yang described her childhood as a time where her father would sing poetry and he lead by example on how to live a passionate life. Her father was an influential man who lived his life as a song. The impact Yang’s father had inspired her to write her second book, which she calls an album, because her father stopped singing and creating poetry. She began by organizing The Song Poet like an album. Each chapter is explained like a song that can stand on its own. This book helped her get through her miscarriage and help her to recognize that despite walking through a world that is falling apart, how one feels is how they will appear on paper, to not change what people want, but to shift their view to make the world larger.

INTERPRET

Kalia Yang’s memories of emotional distress and joy through her miscarriage, grandmother’s death, and father’s stories relate best to the emotion studies in Honors. Two types of emotions were learned in Honors: primary and secondary emotions. The primary response is the innate or simple learned responses to external stimuli mediated by the amygdala. The secondary response is a series of complex emotional consequences of experiences throughout one’s life. Yang learned to cope with her experiences through writing and saw her life through a new philosophical lens. She explained her past experience with her father and how he told her to “look from the trees at higher horizons.” Through these learned coping techniques, her primary emotions of events such as her father’s use of poetry to keep the family out of poverty, and applied them to secondary emotions such as the death of her grandmother to write her first book, The Latehomecomer, to recon with reality. Yang now uses these memories, through the use of secondary emotions, to pour out her passion and directly relate her experience to understand other people’s background and standpoint, even though the views of others do not completely align with her past.

EVALUATE

Yang’s soul purpose in presenting herself was to impact others and shift their view to a larger world. She talked about how it is easy for the world to convince people to believe that they do not matter, but in reality, “…everyone has a world within. Every time we do not share, the world dies a little everyday. People need to listen.”

She said, “I love to fish. I never catch fish, but I love the possibility. That’s how I am with people. There is always bait on the line and a hook in the water.” This portion of the convocation inspired me because I would consider myself a people person and I love to go fishing. I can never catch fish, but I love the possibility to meet others and create a relationship with another person and get a look at their world within.

Conversation Convocation

DESCRIBE

The convocation was based on Concordia’s book of the year– Reclaiming conversation and emphasised in Connect, Community, and Conversation. Dr. Chatman focused primarily on connecting with other to help students understand Concordia’s promise, tradition, history, and love for diversity. Next, Dr. Woodward talked about the book of the year and presented some videos of the author, Sherry Turkle, explaining her book. The main point Turkle made was that empathy and face-to-face conversations allow people to understand one another, where technology allows people to smooth out conversations and create a new person behind a screen. Sherry said, “Phones give the fantasy that one never has to be alone for a moment.” Then, Danielle Tietjen and Abdul Wright –two Concordia alumni– spoke. Both speakers stressed the diversity of all people and the uniqueness everyone brings; that no one should waste an opportunity to get to know another person; everyone is valuable and important. Danielle Tietjen shared some of her experiences to relate the importance of face-to-face connections. She also pointed out, “Simple things hold us back from embracing real human connections. Get out and do not be afraid to take a chance, risk boldly, and be uncomfortable.” Abdul Wright spoke about loving one another unconditionally, staying grounded, and remembering the importance of human relationships because people want to support one another and see each other succeed to impact more people.

 

INTEGRATE

The speeches from the convocation directly relate to truth. Relationships are supposed to be awkward, messy, rich, and full of weirdness, but technology allows people to present themselves the way they want to and clean up any and all rough edges to a conversation. Technology contorts truths including: coherence, consistency, custom, emotion, postmodernism, critical realism and realism; whereas face-to-face conversations bring empathy and understanding. All of these forms of truths are and can be contorted through the use of technology because people can force the viewer to perceive them in a different way than who they really are, completely shattering the idea of critical realism and causing people to rethink the way they test truth. For example, in postmodernism, if someone posts adventures they have been on and pretend to be spontaneous, but are not consistent from social media to their normal life they are not telling the truth and are shaping people’s custom truths and other tests of truth.

 

EVALUATE

I enjoyed the convocation. I do not think I learned anything particularly new, but it was a great refresher to realize the importance of human connections and to reflect on the  relationships I have formed within this past year. The speeches helped me recognize the strong relationships I have made, and still hold today, are mainly through face-to-face interactions and were created through those experience to create a deeper and close-knit friendship. Wright and Tietjen both spoke of impacting others and their stories were very different. I believe that one does not have to have a bad experience or a terrible upbringing to have an impact on others. It’s about the connections made and the experiences with others that bring relationships and understanding to the table. It increases a person’s ability to empathize with others and impact others.